Critical Hit Chance, OA and DA table, DPS increase from OA and CHD

Critical Hit Chance table

The most readable PTH formula I could obtain is
main6

should be equivalent to the official formula below, parsing that with eyes requires galaxy brain though
PTH= ((((Attacker’s OA / ((Defender’s DA / 3.5) + Attacker’s OA)) * 300) * 0.3) + (((((Attacker’s OA * 3.25) + 10000) – (Defender’s DA * 3.25)) / 100) * 0.7)) – 50
See it in Wolfram Alpha

Chance to critically hit is as follows (for PTH ≥ 89):
main4
because:

  • 1, 2, …, 89 rolls aren’t crits
  • 90, 91, …, PTH are crits
  • possibible results are 1 - 100 for PTH < 100 and 1 - PTH for PTH ≥ 100
  • if PTH ≥ 100 there are no misses; if PTH < 100, then PTH + 1, …, 100 are misses

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DPS multiplier table (doesn’t include Critical Damage stat, see examples)

main5

  • T is a PTH Threshold that separates different Tiers of Critical Hits
  • 0.1 is a 10% bonus damage we get cumulatively with each Tier

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Example 1
Let’s calculate a real DPS multiplier using these tables.
Suppose OA= 3400, DA=2200, CHD=90%.

From the table we read

  • CHC = 27.6%
  • DPS multiplier = 1.05

The true DPS multiplier including CHD is
1.05 + 27.6% * 90% =
1.05 + 0.276 * 0.9 =
1.2984 ≈
1.3

a.k.a. 30% more dmg on average in comparison to normal hit
or 1.3 / 0.9 ≈ 44% more dmg on average than if our OA was the same as enemy’s DA (2200)
btw standard multiplier when OA=DA is 0.9 not 1 because we miss 10% of the time then

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Example 2
How much % relative DPS increase raising OA by 200 is going to give me (see the previous example)?
We calculate DPS multiplier for 3600 OA = 1.06 + 30.5% * 90% = 1.3345
(using new multiplier and CHC)

Let’s divide new multiplier by old multiplier:
1.3345 / 1.2984 ≈ 1.028

Answer: raising OA by 200 increases our DPS by around 2.8%
(assuming we have 3400 OA at first and hit 2200 DA enemy)

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This is very convenient. Thanks tqFan!

I have seen PHT chary table but this is really easy way to see direct crit chance according to OA/DA, thanks!

Table corrected, I’ve made a little mistake assuming 1-90 roll is non-crit but it’s 1-89 so %'s were 1% too small.

Thanks, clarify now, can you make the multi-crit modifier chart? (the bigger orange text in game)

Not sure, I’ll think about it but first I would have to know what the orange color is about, which tiers of crits it includes. One more thing is that when you have for example 100% Critical Damage, the difference between Crit Tiers is not that important, i.e. 210% dmg vs 230% dmg (Tier 1 vs Tier 3).

Game guide:

#### PTH Threshold 2: 90 (1.1x Damage)

When your PTH reaches 90 and beyond, you will begin to see critical hits.

*Example: PTH = 97, 1-89 hits, 90-97 critically hits for 1.1x damage, 98-100 misses*

#### PTH Threshold 3: 105 (1.2x Damage)

At PTH 100 and above, you cannot miss your target. At PTH 105+, you will begin to see the second tier of critical hits.

*Example: PTH = 107, 1-89 hits, 90-104 critically hits for 1.1x damage, 105-107 critically hits for 1.2x damage*

#### PTH Threshold 4: 120 (1.3x Damage)

At PTH 120 and above, you will begin to see the third tier of critical hits.

*Example: PTH = 124, 1-89 hits, 90-104 critically hits for 1.1x damage, 105-119 critically hits for 1.2x damage, 120-124 critically hits for 1.3x damage*

#### PTH Threshold 5 and 6: 130 (1.4x Damage) and 135 (1.5x damage)

This chart is a good idea but i think you should shift the DA values in it to 2150-3150 range. It’ll be more practically useful.

2150-2200 DA is smth common among the regular mobs. And the absolute highest is 3161 - the DA value of Celestials at lvl 113.

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Updated. Click to zoom the table.
If you don’t like the trapezoid shape above, @banana_peel is to blame.

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I’m not very uh… mathematically “inclined”… Regarding the “1-89 hits”, what does this mean? That 89 of your hits are likely to be non-crits? Or 1 in 89 hits has the chance to be a crit? Or something else entirely?

I think the game guide explains that better than I could:

Example: PTH = 65, 1-65 hits for 92.86% damage, 66-100 misses**
PTH Threshold 2: 90 (1.1x Damage)

When your PTH reaches 90 and beyond, you will begin to see critical hits.

Example: PTH = 97, 1-89 hits, 90-97 critically hits for 1.1x damage, 98-100 misses**
PTH Threshold 3: 105 (1.2x Damage)

At PTH 100 and above, you cannot miss your target. At PTH 105+, you will begin to see the second tier of critical hits.

Example: PTH = 107, 1-89 hits, 90-104 critically hits for 1.1x damage, 105-107 critically hits for 1.2x damage
PTH Threshold 4: 120 (1.3x Damage)

At PTH 120 and above, you will begin to see the third tier of critical hits.

Example: PTH = 124, 1-89 hits, 90-104 critically hits for 1.1x damage, 105-119 critically hits for 1.2x damage, 120-124 critically hits for 1.3x damage

From this guide I conclude that if PTH >= 100 (for PTH < 100 there’s minor difference so I skip it)
your dice is dPTH (if PTH is 117.5 when you can roll 1, 2, …, 117)
and according to the guide 1, … 89 are normal hits; 90, …, 117 are crits (of different tiers)
hence the crit chance is (117 - 89) / 117 because there are 117 possible rolls and 89 of them are not crits.

In this system it’s hard to get very high crit chance because there are always 89 guaranteed non-crit rolls which keep the crit chance at bay. Even with 180 PTH and 1 - 180 dice you would have only 50% crit chance because 1 - 89 are set programmed to be non-crits

GD has such prevention mechanisms in every corner which on the one hand help to maintain balance but on the other they take away the fun of abusing the mechanics. I still prefer the former though.

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Dude, thank you- you explained that really well. I can visualize it now and that equation makes total sense.

I hear you about abusing the mechanics, so many exciting thoughts go through my head when I consider the tiers of crits, but then the safeguards creep in and remind me there’s no way to break it. I am also glad about that. Game would be horribly imbalanced if it was breakable. Probably the closest thing to breaking it is just maintaining highest PTH and attack/cast speeds, laced with DoT effects to have as many sources hitting as fast as possible.

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equipping chains of anguish

Lol, I love that belt. It’s one of only a couple items that has a proc that’s disadvantageous to the player. Personally I think that’s one of the most interesting ways to balance an item.

I have a special memory with this belt. It’s the first good belt I’ve found. And it was like ‘Oh wait, I’ve missed this hidden area half a map away’. After some hesitation I went back, destroyed a plain simple crate and there was is - the bugged meme belt.

Update

  • new table with DPS multiplier showing how your damage increases from OA on average (not including Critical Damage stat)

    • should have included 1 more decimal place for more precision
  • examples

    • showing how to use the tables to calculate true DPS multiplier that includes CHD
    • how to calculate relative DPS increase that you get from raising OA
  • CHC table corrected

    • was a little off for PTH < 100 because I didn’t include misses that occur if you roll in the [PTH + 1, 100] range
  • added 1 decimal place to CHC table

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Now my main question is this- how do you know what the value is for DA? Looking up the monster on grimtools?

This is not the only way. You can also reverse engineer it in the following way:

  • attack the monster
  • check the Crit Chance by hovering over the Offensive Ability in character sheet
  • now you know both OA and Crit Chance so you can check what’s the corresponding DA in the table

Btw I’ve just checked that my crit table matches what Grim Dawn displays.

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Boots of blinding speed. Loved Morrowind. Theres even an equivalent in GD.

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how about alternating cell-coloring for readability?

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Yes the boots of unseeing swiftness or something like that, love those too! Shit man… I’m all fired up to make a build that uses all these janky gear pieces, and drinks burrwitch brew constantly lol

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